Difference between revisions of "Tetris (Sega)"

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==Power-on Pattern==
==Power-on Pattern==
One characteristic of this version of Tetris was the existence of a "Power-on pattern". This referred to the game's behavior that the string of pieces it dealt in the very first game after starting up the system was always the same. This was most probably caused by the state of the randomization seed in the system. After its discovery, players began constructing gameplay plans around the power-on pattern in order to max out the score in the least lines possible. Sega's [[Sega Tetris|1998 version of Tetris]] (Arcade, Dreamcast) pays tribute to the power-on pattern, by dealing the sequence in the final level of the single-player game.
One characteristic of this version of Tetris was the existence of a "Power-on pattern". This referred to the game's behavior that the string of pieces it dealt in the very first game after starting up the system was always the same. This was most probably caused by the state of the randomization seed in the system. After its discovery, players began constructing gameplay plans around the power-on pattern in order to max out the score in the least lines possible. Sega's [[Sega Tetris|2000 version of Tetris]] (Arcade, Dreamcast) pays tribute to the power-on pattern, by dealing the sequence in the final level of the single-player game.
==Availability==
==Availability==
A fairly accurate representation of the game, along with [[Tetris: New Century]], [[Flash Point]] and [[Bloxeed]], can be obtained in the Japanese PS2 game ''[[Sega Ages 2500 Series Vol.28 Tetris Collection]]''.
A fairly accurate representation of the game, along with [[Tetris: New Century]], [[Flash Point]] and [[Bloxeed]], can be obtained in the Japanese PS2 game ''[[Sega Ages 2500 Series Vol.28 Tetris Collection]]''.
*[[Game]]s
*[[Game]]s

Revision as of 15:24, 19 February 2007

Tetris
Developer(s)Sega
Publisher(s)Sega
Platform(s)Arcade
Release1988
Gameplay info
Next pieces1
Playfield size10x20
Hold pieceNo
Hard dropNo

Sega's 1988 Arcade version of Tetris was the version that took Japanese arcades by storm, becoming one of the most commonly known versions of the game. Due to its popularity, it became the base of rules for many other Japanese games created later on, both licensed and unlicensed. Such games include the TGM series, Tetris Plus series, Shimizu Tetris and, to less extent, DTET. It was one of the first games to instate lock delay, improving maneuverability greatly at high speeds compared to games which did not have the feature.

Gameplay specifics

Being an early game, there was only one rotation button, which rotated counterclockwise. The game also contained no wallkicks and no hard drop. However, many of the elements that exist in later games can already be seen here, such as 1G DAS movement, lock delay, ARE, and rotation/movement processed before gravity - allowing for synchro moves to be performed at 1G fall speed. One rule element not commonly seen in recent games is the existence of the field ceiling. The field height is fixed at 20 cells, and any rotation that would exceed that height would fail.

It was one of the first games to popularize the play model of playing endlessly against increasing speed for survival, as opposed to beating levels or clearing a predefined number of lines.

Power-on Pattern

One characteristic of this version of Tetris was the existence of a "Power-on pattern". This referred to the game's behavior that the string of pieces it dealt in the very first game after starting up the system was always the same. This was most probably caused by the state of the randomization seed in the system. After its discovery, players began constructing gameplay plans around the power-on pattern in order to max out the score in the least lines possible. Sega's 2000 version of Tetris (Arcade, Dreamcast) pays tribute to the power-on pattern, by dealing the sequence in the final level of the single-player game.

Availability

A fairly accurate representation of the game, along with Tetris: New Century, Flash Point and Bloxeed, can be obtained in the Japanese PS2 game Sega Ages 2500 Series Vol.28 Tetris Collection.